I have to admit it.  When it comes to digital scams, I'm pretty good at figuring out what's real and what's not.  On the way home from an outing, I suddenly received a text message from someone who claims to be the CEO of the company I work for.  For a moment, this had me going.

Photo: Joseph Browning
Photo: Joseph Browning
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Photo: Joseph Browning
Photo: Joseph Browning
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At first, I'm thinking "Wow. This is a test to see if I'm a reliable employee."  I am honored that our CEO would think he could count on me to do this very important task.

So, I hurried to the nearest CVS and quickly found the gift cards and answered his request.

Photo: Joseph Browning
Photo: Joseph Browning
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Then, I realized that due to laws governing how corporations work, a request such as this would not be appropriate, in fact, it could be of dubious legality.  I called a friend who is much smarter than I am when it comes to these things, and that's when he told me the same thing has happened to him, a couple of times.

This is a well known scam. At least to SOME people but it only takes one slip up for  scammers to rob you. These scammers are clever. They check your social media posts to see where you work.  They, then,  find the name of the CEO or an executive with the company. Then, it's off to the races.   Authorities say these are mostly foreign scammers who manage to dupe thousands of people and pocket millions every year from scams like these.

 

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